Dan KildeeDan Kildee – MI5

Current Position: US Representative for MI 5th District since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Genesee County Treasurer from 1996 – 2012

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Thank you to these brave police officers. Thank you for protecting the lives of members, staff and visitors on January 6th. Thank you for defending our democracy. Thank you for your heroism & bravery to testify before Congress and bring the truth to the American people.

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Congressman Dan Kildee full interview discussing video captured during Capitol riot

Kildee says Flint can put the world on wheels again -- electrified wheels
mlive.com, Ron Fonger September 1, 2021 (Short)

FLINT, MI — In a city that boomed thanks to vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee said Wednesday, Sept. 1, that Flint can reclaim that legacy — in a slightly different way.

“Flint is known for putting the world on wheels,” Kildee, D-Flint Twp., said in a virtual news conference. “Right now, what I’m doing is working in Congress to ensure we put the world on electrified wheels.”

The congressman urged lawmakers to back President Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill and his “Build Back Better Budget,” which he said would help expand the market for EVs and invest in the infrastructure needed to support them.

“I see this as a chance for us to learn from some of the past mistakes (in the auto industry) and ensure that the United States — not China — lead this transition to electric vehicles,” Kildee said.

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Current Position: US Representative for MI 5th District since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Genesee County Treasurer from 1996 – 2012

Featured Quote: 
Thank you to these brave police officers. Thank you for protecting the lives of members, staff and visitors on January 6th. Thank you for defending our democracy. Thank you for your heroism & bravery to testify before Congress and bring the truth to the American people.

Featured Video: 
Congressman Dan Kildee full interview discussing video captured during Capitol riot

News

Kildee says Flint can put the world on wheels again — electrified wheels
mlive.com, Ron Fonger September 1, 2021 (Short)

FLINT, MI — In a city that boomed thanks to vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee said Wednesday, Sept. 1, that Flint can reclaim that legacy — in a slightly different way.

“Flint is known for putting the world on wheels,” Kildee, D-Flint Twp., said in a virtual news conference. “Right now, what I’m doing is working in Congress to ensure we put the world on electrified wheels.”

The congressman urged lawmakers to back President Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill and his “Build Back Better Budget,” which he said would help expand the market for EVs and invest in the infrastructure needed to support them.

“I see this as a chance for us to learn from some of the past mistakes (in the auto industry) and ensure that the United States — not China — lead this transition to electric vehicles,” Kildee said.

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About

Dan Kildee 1

Source: Government page

Born and raised in Flint, Congressman Dan Kildee is a lifelong Michigander. In Congress, he has proven he can bring people together and get real results for his constituents and Michigan.

  • Fighting Blight in Michigan: Congressman Kildee secured hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds to help strengthen neighborhoods, raise home values and make communities safer by removing abandoned houses across Michigan, including in Flint and Saginaw.
  • Freeing a Marine Veteran from Prison in Iran: When one of his constituents, Amir Hekmati, an American citizen and U.S. Marine veteran was held as a political prisoner in Iran, Congressman Kildee worked alongside the Hekmati family to raise awareness and ultimately negotiate Amir’s release.
  • Getting Real Aid for Flint Families During the Water Crisis: During the water crisis in Flint, Congressman Kildee worked tirelessly to bring much needed relief to Flint families. He led the fight – bringing Democrats and Republicans together – to pass legislation bringing over $100 million in federal funds to help replace lead pipes and expand health care to residents. And he worked across the aisle to pass laws to prevent a similar crisis from happening in the future. Lastly, he worked with the Obama Administration to secure additional hundreds of millions to help Flint recover, including Medicaid expansion, funding for new jobs and nutritious foods.
  • Protecting the Great Lakes from Nuclear Waste: Congressman Kildee led the fight to successfully stop a Canadian company from permanently burying nuclear waste less than one mile from the Great Lakes.

Congressman Dan Kildee holds various leadership positions in Congress. As Chief Deputy Whip—part of the Democratic leadership team in the 116th Congress—he acts as an important liaison among Members of Congress and the leadership to build support for Democratic priorities and legislation.

Congressman Kildee serves on the prestigious Ways and Means Committee, the oldest and one of the most powerful committees in the U.S. House of Representatives. On the committee, Congressman Kildee works to lower the costs of health care premiums and prescription drugs, protect Social Security and Medicare, negotiate fair trade deals, and create a tax system that benefits working families, not just the richest corporations. The committee also has vast jurisdiction over important programs including Unemployment Insurance, enforcement of child support laws, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, and foster care and adoption programs.

Before being elected to Congress, Congressman Kildee co-founded and served as the president of the Center for Community Progress, a national non-profit organization focused on urban land reform and revitalization.

He also founded Michigan’s first land bank – the Genesee County Land Bank – which is responsible for tens of millions of dollars in redevelopment in Flint. The Genesee County Land Bank later served as a model for over 100 other land banks across the nation.

Previously, Congressman Dan Kildee served as the Genesee County Treasurer, on the Genesee County Board of Commissioners, and on the Flint Board of Education. Additionally, he worked for eight years at the Whaley Children’s Center, a residential treatment facility in Flint for children who have experienced trauma and abuse.

Congressman Kildee resides in Flint Township with his wife, Jennifer. They have two children, Kenneth and Katy. Dan’s oldest son, Ryan, and his wife Ginger are the parents of their first two grandchildren, Caitlin and Colin.

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Wikipedia Entry

Daniel Timothy Kildee (/ˈkɪld/; born August 11, 1958) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 5th congressional district since 2013. He is a member of the Democratic Party.

Throughout his career, Kildee has served both as an elected official and a CEO of a national nonprofit organization. From 1984 to 2009, he served in a couple of county-level elected positions, as a Genesee County commissioner and Genesee County Treasurer. On November 6, 2012, he was elected the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 5th district. He succeeded his uncle Dale Kildee, who represented Flint in the House for 36 years. He resides in Flint Township, Michigan.[1]

Early life and education

Kildee was born in 1958 in Flint, Michigan. He attended Flint Northern High School and Central Michigan University. In 2008, he finished his coursework at CMU, earning a B.S. in community development administration. He took courses in philosophy and community administration.[2][3]

Flint local political career

At age 18, Kildee became one of the nation’s youngest elected officials when he was elected to the Flint Board of Education in 1977.[4]

In 1984, Kildee was elected to serve on Genesee County‘s board of commissioners, subsequently serving for 12 years, including five as chair.[5] As chair, Kildee led the effort to form the Bishop International Airport Authority.[citation needed]

In 1991, he ran for mayor of Flint. He was one of four candidates to challenge incumbent Mayor Matthew Collier in the August 6 nonpartisan primary election. City Councilman Woodrow Stanley finished first with 24% of the vote. Collier ranked second with 23% of the vote, qualifying for the November election. Kildee finished third with 18%.[6]

County Treasurer

In 1996, Kildee was elected Genesee County Treasurer. He was reelected in 2000, 2004, and 2008. He was reelected in 2008 with 72% of the vote.[7] As treasurer, Kildee oversaw the county’s credit rating and presided over five bond-rating upgrades for the county.[citation needed]

Land Bank

In 2002, he founded the Genesee County Land Bank, a first of its kind in the nation governmental authority dedicated to urban decay in cities such as Flint.[8][9] The land bank has helped to clean up vacant and abandoned structures in the community.[10]

The U.S. government, nonprofit organizations and think tanks have approached Kildee to expand his work to 50 cities identified by the Brookings Institution, focused mostly in the Rust Belt and northeastern United States, including Detroit, Baltimore, Memphis, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh, which have many vacant and abandoned properties.[11]

Center for Community Progress

In 2009, Kildee co-founded and served as the president of The Center for Community Progress, a national nonprofit organization with offices in New Orleans, Atlanta and Washington, D.C.[12][13] He resigned as county treasurer to oversee the Center, intended to reform land sales to stop the spread of blight.[14]

U.S. House of Representatives

Dan Kildee at the Spring 2017 Michigan Democratic Convention

Elections

2012

Kildee’s uncle Dale Kildee served in the House of Representatives representing Michigan’s 5th congressional district.[15] In July 2011, Dale Kildee announced he would retire from Congress.[16] Dan Kildee declared his candidacy for the House on November 1, 2011.[1] He was unchallenged in the Democratic primary. In the November election, he defeated Republican State Representative Jim Slezak, 65% to 31%.[16]

Tenure

In January 2013, then-House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer appointed Kildee assistant whip. His fellow freshmen Democratic members elected Kildee to serve as their representative to the caucus’s Steering and Policy Committee.[17]

Kildee has focused on several issues, including urban development and supporting cities, raising the federal minimum wage, and promoting American manufacturing. He was also a vocal advocate for extending emergency unemployment insurance after it expired on December 28, 2013.[citation needed]

Kildee was successful in his first six months in office in securing $100 million in federal funds for five Michigan cities, including Flint and Saginaw, so they had resources to tear down vacant, abandoned and rundown properties.[18] He has also been a strong advocate for the “Make it in America” initiative, a package of bipartisan bills that were introduced in the House to help create a national manufacturing policy and promote American manufacturing.[19]

Kildee fought for the release of Amir Mirza Hekmati, a constituent and U.S. Marine veteran who was held as a political prisoner in Iran for nearly five years. Working alongside the Hekmati family and the Obama administration to raise awareness, Amir’s release was eventually negotiated and he was freed in January 2016.[20]

In September 2016, Kildee pushed Congress to include funding to aid in the Flint water crisis.[21] Congress passed a funding measure that provided $170 million in aid to communities including Flint that needed infrastructure improvements for their water.[22]

In April 2018, Kildee, Jared Huffman, Jamie Raskin, and Jerry McNerney launched the Congressional Freethought Caucus. Its stated goals include “pushing public policy formed on the basis of reason, science, and moral values”, promoting the “separation of church and state”, and opposing discrimination against “atheists, agnostics, humanists, seekers, religious and nonreligious persons”. Huffman and Raskin act as co-chairs.[23]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Kildee has been married to Jennifer Kildee since 1988. They have three children, two of whom are in college, Kenneth at the University of Michigan-Flint and Katy at Central Michigan University. They have two grandchildren.[16][28]

After an effort to draft him into the 2010 Michigan gubernatorial election,[29] Kildee set up an exploratory committee,[30] but shortly thereafter decided not to run.[12] He was also rumored to be considering a run in the 2018 Michigan gubernatorial election, but publicly declared he would not, to focus on his work in Congress.[31] He is close friends with filmmaker Michael Moore, whom he has known since high school.

References

  1. ^ a b Burns, Gus (May 14, 2012). “Three contenders have officially filed to run for Democratic U.S. Rep. Dale E. Kildee’s seat in Washington D.C.” The Saginaw News. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  2. ^ “New House members of 113th Congress: K-L-M – Politico Staff”. Politico.Com. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  3. ^ “Central Michigan Life – CMU alum, Flint native Dan Kildee sworn in as U.S. congressman”. Cm-life.com. January 7, 2013. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  4. ^ Ryan Garza. “Dan Kildee: Congressman-elect quickly finds himself in the spotlight”. MLive.com. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  5. ^ Fonger, Ron (July 15, 2011). “Dan Kildee says he will consider running for uncle’s congressional seat”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  6. ^ Detroit Free Press, August 8, 1991 @“Flint, MI Mayor – Primary Race – Aug 06, 1991”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  7. ^ “Genesee County Treasurer Race – Nov 04, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  8. ^ Mostafavi, Beata (December 18, 2009). “Dan Kildee: National efforts to clear blight will be based in Flint”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  9. ^ Streitfeld, David (April 21, 2009). “An Effort to Save Flint, Mich., by Shrinking It”. The New York Times. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  10. ^ Kinchen, Dave (December 18, 2009). “Dan Kildee prepares for national urban blight work”. Clio, MI: WEYI-TV. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  11. ^ Leonard, Tom (June 12, 2009). “US cities may have to be bulldozed in order to survive”. The Telegraph. London. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Angus, Laura (March 5, 2010). “Dan Kildee announces his withdrawal from race for Michigan governor”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved August 21, 2010.
  13. ^ Longley, Kristin (March 8, 2012). “Dan Kildee: Reform land sales process to stop spread of blight”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  14. ^ Longley, Kristin (November 1, 2011). “Dan Kildee announcing run for 5th District seat in U.S. Congress to be vacated by uncle, U.S. Rep. Dale Kildee”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  15. ^ Harris, David (July 16, 2011). “Filling U.S. Rep. Dale Kildee’s Congressional seat will be a free-for-all, expert says”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved July 18, 2011.
  16. ^ a b c Thorne, Blake (November 7, 2012). “Dan Kildee: Congressman-elect quickly finds himself in the spotlight”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  17. ^ Courtesy photo. “U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee of Flint appointed assistant Democratic whip”. MLive.com. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  18. ^ “Congressman Dan Kildee: Demolition of 950 Saginaw homes ‘first step’ toward growth”. MLive.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
  19. ^ AP File Photo (April 10, 2013). “Kildee backs ‘Make it in America’ plan aimed at manufacturing rebirth”. MLive.com. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  20. ^ “Amir Hekmati is home after spending more than 4 years in an Iranian prison”. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  21. ^ “House Dem: GOP leaders refuse to help Flint because of race”. Washington Post. September 27, 2016. Archived from the original on September 30, 2016. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
  22. ^ “House OKs Flint aid measure, averts shutdown”. The Detroit News. September 28, 2016. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
  23. ^ Manchester, Julia. “Dem lawmakers launch ‘Freethought’ congressional caucus”. The Hill. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  24. ^ “Official Alphabetical List of the House of Representatives, 116th Congress”. U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  25. ^ “Membership, House Budget Committee Democrats”. U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  26. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  27. ^ “Members”. Afterschool Alliance. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  28. ^ “Full Congressman Dan Kildee biodata”. Dankildee.house.gov. Archived from the original on February 12, 2013. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  29. ^ Fonger, Ron (February 1, 2010). “Dan Kildee’s support growing—at least on Facebook”. The Flint Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  30. ^ “Statewide: Dan Kildee files to begin run for governor”. Detroit Free Press. February 24, 2010. p. A3. Retrieved September 18, 2012. (subscription required)
  31. ^ “U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee will forgo race for governor”. Detroit Free Press. Retrieved May 15, 2017.

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U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan’s 5th congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
175th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Ways and Means Committee
  • House Budget Committee

Legislation

Learn more about the legislation that I sponsored or co-sponsored.

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Elissa SlotkinElissa Slotkin – MI8

Current Position: US Representative for MI 8th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Elissa Blair Slotkin (born July 10, 1976) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 8th congressional district since 2019.

A member of the Democratic Party, she previously served as a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) analyst and Department of Defense official. Her district is based in Lansing, and stretches into the outer northern and western suburbs of Detroit.

Source: Wikipedia

Michigan Rep. Slotkin says her staff safely evacuated 114 Afghan Nationals from Kabul
FOX 2 Detroit, FOX 2 Staff and Connie RahbanyAugust 29, 2021 (Short)

Staff members of Rep. Elissa Slotkin successfully evacuated 114 Afghan nationals out of Kabul and to safety according to a tweet from Slotkin.

She said that over 70 of those evacuated were affiliated with Michigan State University while the other totaling more than 30 were former deputy ministers, staff, and military officers of the former Afghan government who were being threatened and hunted by the Taliban.

“There are simply no words to convey the pain of running from your own country,” Slotkin said.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MI 8th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Elissa Blair Slotkin (born July 10, 1976) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 8th congressional district since 2019.

A member of the Democratic Party, she previously served as a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) analyst and Department of Defense official. Her district is based in Lansing, and stretches into the outer northern and western suburbs of Detroit.

Source: Wikipedia

News

Michigan Rep. Slotkin says her staff safely evacuated 114 Afghan Nationals from Kabul
FOX 2 Detroit, FOX 2 Staff and Connie RahbanyAugust 29, 2021 (Short)

Staff members of Rep. Elissa Slotkin successfully evacuated 114 Afghan nationals out of Kabul and to safety according to a tweet from Slotkin.

She said that over 70 of those evacuated were affiliated with Michigan State University while the other totaling more than 30 were former deputy ministers, staff, and military officers of the former Afghan government who were being threatened and hunted by the Taliban.

“There are simply no words to convey the pain of running from your own country,” Slotkin said.

Twitter

About

Elissa Slotkin 1

Source: Government page

Representative Elissa Slotkin is honored to serve the residents of Michigan’s 8th Congressional District, a district that includes Ingham, Livingston, and North Oakland Counties.

Rep. Slotkin has spent her career in national service. After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which took place during her first week of graduate school in New York City, Rep. Slotkin knew that national service would define her career. She was recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to be a Middle East analyst and went on to devote her career to protecting the United States from national security threats. In her role at the CIA, Rep. Slotkin worked alongside the U.S. military during three tours in Iraq as a militia expert. In between her tours in Iraq, Rep. Slotkin held various defense and intelligence positions under President Bush and President Obama, including roles at the White House and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. In 2011, Rep. Slotkin took a senior position at the Pentagon and, until January 2017, she served as Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. In this role, Rep. Slotkin oversaw policy on Russia, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa at the Pentagon and participated in negotiations on some of the country’s most pressing national security issues.

It is this same mission-focus that Rep. Slotkin brings to issues affecting citizens of Michigan’s 8th congressional district. For Rep. Slotkin, this means ensuring that everyone has access to healthcare they can afford, lowering the price of prescription drugs, protecting access to clean water and Michigan’s Great Lakes, and returning decency and integrity to politics. Rep. Slotkin’s background in national security contributes to the urgency and passion she brings to increasing government integrity and accountability and passing campaign finance reform. To learn more about Rep. Slotkin’s legislative priorities, click here.

A third-generation Michigander, Rep. Slotkin spent her early life on her family farm in Holly, Michigan. The generations of Slotkins before her worked in the family business, Hygrade Foods, which was headquartered in Detroit and produced iconic foods loved by Michiganders, like the Ballpark Frank first sold at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium. The values that made the family business successful instilled in Rep. Slotkin an enduring commitment to integrity, decency, and hard work that guided her to a career of service. The Slotkin family business is well represented in Rep. Slotkin’s office, with hot dog figurines and artwork proudly displayed. Rep. Slotkin attended Cornell University (BA) and Columbia University in the City of New York (MA).

Rep. Slotkin’s home is her family farm in Holly. Rep. Slotkin’s husband, Dave, is a retired Army colonel who served for 30 years as an Apache helicopter pilot. Her two stepdaughters have pursued their own lives of service, one as a physician and the other as a new Army officer.

Our District:

U.S. Representative Elissa Slotkin is proud to serve the people of the 8th Congressional District of Michigan, a district that spans Ingham, Livingston, and North Oakland counties. The major cities include (most of) Lansing, East Lansing, Brighton, Howell, Clarkston, Lake Orion, Rochester, and Rochester Hills.

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Contact

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Offices

Washington, D.C.
1531 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: Phone: (202) 225-4872

Lansing
1100 W. Saginaw St. Suite 3a
Lansing, MI 48915
Phone: Phone: (517) 993-0510

Rochester Hills
445 S. Livernois Suite 316
Rochester Hills, MI 48307
Phone: Phone: (517) 993-0510

Web

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Politics

Recent Elections

2020 US Representative for 8th

Elissa Slotkin (D)172,88050.6%
Mike Bishop (R)158,78246.8%
Brian Ellis (L)6,3021.8%
David Jay Lillis ()2,6290.8%
TOTAL340,593

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

SLOTKIN, ELISSA has run in 2 races for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $11,889,333.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Armed Services Committee
Homeland Security Committee

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Intelligence, Emerging Threats and Capabilities
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Voting Record

See: Government Page

Issues

Governance

Campaign Finance Reform

H.R. 1, “For the People Act”

H.R. 1, or the “For the People Act,” is a once-in-a-generation reform bill that seeks to restore legitimacy to our democracy. I am a co-sponsor of the bill, along with over 220 other Members of Congress. On March 8, 2019, H.R. 1 was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

This comprehensive bill addresses campaign finance reform, accountability, and voting rights in order to root out corruption, increase transparency, and ensure that we return to a government of, by, and for the people.  Some of the bill’s proposed measures include enhancing federal support for voting-system security, upgrading political-contribution disclosure requirements, removing obstacles to voting by making Election Day a national holiday, and closing loopholes for lobbyists and foreign agents.

 

I believe that people have started to lose faith that their government truly represents them because of unlimited money in politics and a belief that too many elected officials have forgotten that they are public servants.

 

I was proud to offer an amendment to H.R. 1 that would close loopholes that currently allow foreign governments and corporations to legally purchase campaign ads for the purpose of influencing U.S. elections. This amendment has significant national security implications, and I was pleased to see that it received broad bipartisan support and was included in the final bill.

 

While I continue to hope that the U.S. Senate will take up and pass H.R. 1 as a comprehensive bill, on April 4, 2019, I, along with Rep. Elise Stefanik, introduced my amendment as a standalone bill, the Preventing Adversaries Internationally from Disbursing Advertising Dollars Act, or the PAID AD Act. I believe this will give us the best chance of making immediate progress on this national security issue while we continue to fight for the more comprehensive government and campaign finance reform that our country so desperately needs.

Economy

United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

 

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a proposed free trade agreement between the three largest countries of North America. If adopted, the USMCA would replace the current North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which has been in place since 1994. The intent of NAFTA was to lower barriers to trade, facilitate cross-border movement of goods and services, and promote conditions of fair competition.

 

On November 30, 2018, after months of negotiations, President Trump, Prime Minister Trudeau of Canada, and President Nieto of Mexico signed the USMCA. While the draft deal was signed by leaders from all three countries, it now needs to be ratified by each country’s legislature before taking effect. When it comes to trade agreements, I take a principled approach: what does a trade deal do for Michigan businesses and Michigan workers? This is the scorecard that any trade deal should be graded against. There are benefits that come from trading with our international partners, but those benefits should not come at the expense of working Americans.

 

To be sure, in many ways USMCA is an improvement on NAFTA, and I was pleased to see some of the provisions that have been included in the deal. For example, improved “rules of origin” will facilitate increased domestic auto manufacturing, protecting American autoworkers. Easing of restrictions on Canadian markets will increase export opportunities – particularly for the Michigan agricultural sector. Finally, I also support the strengthened labor, wage, and environmental protections that seek to improve working conditions, raise wages, protect our environment, and level the playing field for all three countries.

 

However, in my view, some of these positive provisions do no go nearly far enough. For example, many of the labor and environmental protections that are so essential to leveling the playing field and benefiting American workers are insufficient and lack adequate enforcement mechanisms or changes to domestic laws, particularly in Mexico, to be effective.

 

I am also concerned that some provisions in the USMCA may harm American consumers. Of particular concern are the significant giveaways to pharmaceutical companies that will drive up the cost of prescription drugs for consumers while doing nothing to protect American workers. Specifically, increased intellectual property protections for American pharmaceutical companies will impede the development of generic drugs that provide consumers with a more affordable option. Constituents in our district constantly approach me to discuss the skyrocketing cost of prescription drugs and the financial squeeze that it is causing them. I do not support a scenario in which the USMCA exacerbates this already significant problem.

 

The renegotiation of NAFTA has given us an opportunity to do right by American workers. To do so, I will continue to work with United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, my fellow Members of Congress, and constituents to improve upon the USMCA as it currently stands. As your elected representative, please be assured that I will always fight for Michigan workers and will keep your views in mind when the finalized USMCA comes to the House floor for a vote.

Education

For more information concerning work and views related to Education, please contact our office.

Environment

I recognize the consequences of climate change and the threats to our environment, globally and in Michigan. The science is clear: we cannot continue on our current trajectory without causing irreversible harm to our environment. While serving at the Pentagon, I led a team that worked on a first-of-its-kind study into the effects of climate change on our military installations and our forces around the globe. It is a national security issue, and I believe that we need to think about environmental security the way we think about homeland security: it’s about the safety of our families and the preservation of our way of life.

Natural Resources Management Act and LWCF

On February 26, 2019, I proudly voted in support of S. 47, the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act. The bill, now Public Law 116-9, passed both the House and the Senate and was signed into law by the President on March 12, 2019. This sweeping package combines over 100 bills from the previous Congress and puts forth a comprehensive plan for managing and preserving our country’s public lands. You may already be aware that the bill was named in memory of the late Representative John Dingell Jr., to honor his role as a champion for the conservation of public lands in Michigan and around the nation. As a fellow Michigander and outdoor enthusiast, I find this tribute particularly meaningful.

In addition to provisions expanding recreational access to federal lands, supporting fish and wildlife habitat restoration projects, and establishing a research and development program for drones to monitor wildfires, this bill permanently reauthorizes the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). As you likely also know, the LWCF, established in 1964, is one of our most effective programs for safeguarding our nation’s natural resources. This bipartisan initiative directs funds toward the conservation of our national parks, national wildlife refuges, national forests, and the areas around rivers and lakes.

The LWCF also allocates money for state and local governments to fund similar programs. In Michigan alone, the program has contributed over $329 million in funding for some of our most beautiful sites, like the Sleeping Bear Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores. Additional state assistance grants from the LWCF support projects in our very own district, such as the Brighton State Recreation Area in Livingston County, the Proud Lake Recreation Area in Oakland County, and the Lake Lansing Park in Ingham County. Moreover, the LWCF distributes this funding without relying on taxpayer money, as it is supported by revenues collected from offshore oil and gas drilling.

In Michigan, we treasure our natural resources, depend on them to keep our families healthy, and rely on them to keep our economy strong. My family are avid paddlers and we make sure to go camping off the grid at least once a year in one of Michigan’s amazing national or state parks. This tradition gives me a very personal connection to protecting our public lands. With the passage of the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, Michiganders can rest assured that we will be able to enjoy our public lands for years to come. Please know that I will continue to prioritize the conservation and protection of our public lands as your elected representative in Congress.

Save America’s Pollinators Act

The Save America’s Pollinators Act was designed to protect pollinators such as the honeybee, insects, and birds from neonicotinoid pesticides.  These pollinators are critically important to our food systems. In fact, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the honey bee is indirectly responsible for one third of the human diet.

I recognize the need to protect pollinators from harmful neonicotinoids and understand how important these protections are for our entire ecosystem. I first became aware of this issue during my junior year of college, when I lived and worked in Kenya, with a tribe that relies on honey for a significant portion of their diet. I spent lots of time learning to harvest honey, and in the process came to love bees and appreciate their contributions to our ecosystem. As your elected representative, please be assured that I will strongly consider co-sponsorship of the Save America’s Pollinators Act and will keep your support in mind should it come to the floor for a vote. I will also look to find ways to ensure that these protections remain robust without adversely affecting Michigan farmers.

Green New Deal Resolution:

A resolution in support of the Green New Deal, H.Res. 109, was introduced in the House of Representatives on February 7, 2019. The resolution asserts the need for immediate, sweeping action to mitigate the negative effects of climate change and set forth potential policy focuses.

I recognize the consequences of climate change, globally and in Michigan.The science is clear: we cannot continue our current trajectory without causing irreversible harm to our environment. While serving at the Pentagon, I led a team that worked on a first-of-its-kind study into the effects of climate change on our military installations and our forces around the globe. It is a national security issue and I believe that we need to think about environmental security the way we think about homeland security: it’s about the safety of our families and the preservation of our way of life.

To that end, I agree with many of the tenets of the proposed Green New Deal. Upgrading our national infrastructure to ensure access to clean water and reduce the risks posed by flooding, transitioning toward clean energy sources, reducing carbon emissions, and creating high-quality union jobs in renewable energy industries are all priorities for me. I appreciate both the sense of urgency that the proposal brings to the conversation on environmental security and the passion of the young people who have brought this conversation to the national stage.

With an issue as urgent as combating climate change, we must focus both on big, bold initiatives like those proposed in the Green New Deal resolution and on areas where we have the most common ground and we can get passed into law. I am working on a few pragmatic measures that I am excited to move forward. I am an original cosponsor of the Water Affordability, Transparency, Equity and Reliability (WATER) Act of 2019, a measure that would provide for sweeping investment in our country’s water infrastructure and generate thousands of new jobs.

As the co-chair of a Democratic task force focusing on transportation and infrastructure, I am committed to looking for innovative and environmentally sound ways to fix our country’s aging infrastructure. I understand the urgency of this issue and will move forward quickly on climate change-related legislation.

Climate Action Now Act

I am proud to co-sponsor H.R. 9, the Climate Action Now Act. This bill, which passed the U.S. House of Representatives with bipartisan support on May 2, 2019, would recommit the United States to the environmental standards set forth under the Paris Climate Accord, which was negotiated in 2015 by representatives of 196 countries to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. In 2017, the current administration announced their intention to withdraw the United States. from the agreement by 2020, the earliest possible date. The Climate Action Now Act would reverse this decision by prohibiting the use of federal funds to take actions to remove the Unites States from the accord. It would also require the Administration to submit to Congress a plan for the United States to meet its voluntary commitments under the accord. The bill has now moved to the U.S. Senate for passage.

Health Care

Cost of Care

Representative Slotkin is always looking for opportunities to hear directly from constituents, and integrate their unique stories into her work to advance legislation on issues that matter to 8th district residents. She would sincerely appreciate your willingness to share your story describing how the costs of healthcare or prescription drugs have affected you and your family.

Mental Health Awareness Act

The Mental Health Access Improvement Act would amend the Social Security Act to allow licensed professional counselors to provide mental health services under the Medicare program. Today, seniors are unable to use Medicare to see a licensed professional counselor and consequently face barriers to receiving adequate mental health care. The bill would also extend Medicare coverage to marriage and family therapists.

 

I want to ensure that seniors do not face obstacles to receive mental health treatment. The cost of health care has been the issue I have heard about most. As such, I strongly support efforts to make health care, including mental health care, affordable and accessible for all.

For more information concerning work and views related to Health, please contact our office.

Immigration

H.R. 6, The American Dream and Promise Act of 2019

America is a nation of immigrants and was built by courageous men and women who traveled from around the world with the hope of living the American dream. Unfortunately, our immigration system at present is fundamentally broken, and I am committed to working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to pass comprehensive immigration reform. This reform must address immigration as a national security issue, an economic issue, and a moral issue.

 

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was a program established in 2012 to protect individuals who were brought to the United States as children from being deported. Today, there are over 700,000 individuals who benefit from the program and as many as 1.8 million are estimated to be eligible. These individuals were brought to the United States by their parents and often have had no lives in their countries of origin. Deportation would be devastating and would mean sending these individuals away from the only home they’ve ever known. Despite these realities, the current administration ended the DACA program in September 2017. While current DACA recipients have avoided deportation pending legal challenges, they remain in a state of limbo.

 

I believe it would be immoral to deport the thousands of DACA recipients who have been raised in this country. They are our neighbors, coworkers, and friends, and they deserve a pathway to citizenship in the country they love. As such, I am proud to be a co-sponsor of H.R. 6, the American Dream and Promise Act of 2019. This bill would provide conditional green cards and work authorizations to immigrants who meet criteria nearly identical to the DACA program. These individuals could earn full permanent residency through work, education, or military service.

 

Individuals covered by Temporary Protected Status (TPS) or Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) – programs designed to protect immigrants from particularly dangerous parts of the world – face similarly uncertain futures as the current administration has also moved to end both of these programs. For now, the courts have blocked the administration’s attempts pending legal challenges. H.R. 6, which currently sits in the House Committee on the Judiciary and the House Committee on Education and Labor, would erase this uncertainty by providing TPS and DED individuals with green cards and a similar path to permanent residency as DACA recipients.

 

I will work my fellow Members of Congress to advance the American Dream and Promise Act of 2019 while simultaneously pushing for the broader immigration reform that we so desperately need.

 

The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program

The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program was established in 1990 as a way to offer visas to individuals from countries underrepresented in the U.S. population. This program is highly competitive, attracting nearly 15 million applications in some years.

All applicants to the program must meet or exceed baseline education or professional experience levels to be considered. This means the equivalent of a high school diploma or two years of work experience in an occupation that requires at least two years of training. Moreover, the entries chosen in the lottery do not automatically receive a visa. Rather, those selected become eligible to apply for a visa. This application process involves extensive vetting by numerous government agencies to root out any potential security threats.

 

I recognize that there are areas for improvement in the current Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, such as a renewed focus on matching the skills of those who immigrate to the needs of our economy. However, I also feel that the program is a valuable tool for those who seek to legally immigrate to the United States and share in the American dream. While I do not believe that eliminating the program is the best course of action, I will keep in mind potential improvements to the program.

Veterans

For more information concerning work and views related to Veterans issues, please contact our office.

X
Andy LevinAndy Levin – MI9

Current Position: US Representative for MI 9th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Other Positions:  
Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation

Quote: 
Look at this amazing piece created by young artists in support of my BUILD GREEN Act with @SenWarren
and @AOC! The next generation of organizers and activists has already picked up that the arts are vitally important to the struggle for justice. Very impressive!

Featured Video: 
Congressman Andy Levin on $15 minimum wage and COVID relief

i
Rep. Andy Levin: Here’s the missing link to school reopenings
Michigan Advance, Andy LevinAugust 5, 2021

I just hosted a Zoom call with suburban Detroit educators. It was heart-wrenching.

They spoke of teachers asking about life insurance and legal services to ensure their wills are in order. They talked about administrators doing their best to prepare for fall, but unable — because of inaction from the Senate on additional federal relief—to budget or plan. And because the Trump administration has so politicized Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidance to schools, folks don’t know how reliable it is.

Amidst a pandemic, 90% of what we’re fighting is not disease, but denial of reality and science.

We’re also fighting against time. There is so much we needed to do differently at the start of the pandemic — chief among them, ramping up a national contact tracing and testing program. Countries like Germany and South Korea offer a view of what could be, contained infection rates and children back in the classroom.

Despite the months lost, though, we can still get ahead of COVID-19.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MI 9th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Other Positions:  
Vice Chair, Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation

Quote: 
Look at this amazing piece created by young artists in support of my BUILD GREEN Act with @SenWarren
and @AOC! The next generation of organizers and activists has already picked up that the arts are vitally important to the struggle for justice. Very impressive!

Featured Video: 
Congressman Andy Levin on $15 minimum wage and COVID relief

News

i
Rep. Andy Levin: Here’s the missing link to school reopenings
Michigan Advance, Andy LevinAugust 5, 2021

I just hosted a Zoom call with suburban Detroit educators. It was heart-wrenching.

They spoke of teachers asking about life insurance and legal services to ensure their wills are in order. They talked about administrators doing their best to prepare for fall, but unable — because of inaction from the Senate on additional federal relief—to budget or plan. And because the Trump administration has so politicized Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidance to schools, folks don’t know how reliable it is.

Amidst a pandemic, 90% of what we’re fighting is not disease, but denial of reality and science.

We’re also fighting against time. There is so much we needed to do differently at the start of the pandemic — chief among them, ramping up a national contact tracing and testing program. Countries like Germany and South Korea offer a view of what could be, contained infection rates and children back in the classroom.

Despite the months lost, though, we can still get ahead of COVID-19.

Twitter

About

Andy Levin 1

Source: Government page

A union organizer, human rights activist, workforce policy expert and green energy entrepreneur, Congressman Andy Levin has spent his career fighting for an equitable and inclusive future for all people. He’s bringing that fight to Congress as the proud representative for Michigan’s 9th District.

Andy has been advocating for working families since the 1980s, when he organized hundreds of health care workers for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). After working with Haitian immigrant workers, Andy co-founded an organization to assist immigrants with challenges posed by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

Continuing his work to strengthen organized labor, Andy worked in Washington, D.C. as a staff attorney to the presidential Commission on the Future of Worker-Management Relations and also in the secretary’s office of the U.S. Department of Labor. Andy worked with unions and employers on legislation critical for workers’ rights including the National Labor Relations Act, the proposed TEAM Act, the Federal Transit’s Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act.

From 1995-2006, Andy served as Assistant Director of Organizing at the national AFL-CIO, where he created and ran Union Summer, helped many unions with collaborative organizing campaigns around the country, and created and led the Voice@Work Campaign, which organized the national movement to pass the Employee Free Choice Act.

Andy took his advocacy work to the Michigan state government, where he created and ran the state’s No Work Left Behind initiative that helped more than 160,000 unemployed and underemployed Michiganders go back to school during the Great Recession. On a mission to unite sustainability and workforce development, Andy also helped create Michigan’s Green Jobs Initiative in 2008 and the Green Jobs Report in 2009. Andy went on to create the Michigan Academy for Green Mobility Alliance (MAGMA), which trained hundreds of unemployed and incumbent engineers to electrify cars.

In 2011, Andy founded Levin Energy Partners LLC as an entrepreneurial force to help shape Michigan’s and America’s energy future. Andy created and ran a statewide market to finance clean energy building improvements called Lean & Green Michigan, which has become one of the most innovative Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs in the US.  In 2018, Andy’s program helped a wide variety of building owners initiate $17,900,000 in clean energy projects.

Andy has worked on human rights for decades, including doing legal work for asylum seekers in the US and investigating and reporting on human rights abuses in Haiti, China and Tibet.

Born in Detroit and raised in Berkley, MI, Andy is an honors graduate of Williams College and Harvard Law School and holds a Masters Degree from the University of Michigan in Asian Languages and Cultures, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities.

Andy has long been active in the spiritual and social justice life of the Jewish community.  Until his election to Congress, he served as president of a Reconstructionist Jewish synagogue, Congregation T’chiyah, and  as chair of the steering committee of Detroit Jews for Justice, an organization he helped create to fight for racial and economic justice in Detroit.

Andy married his high school sweetheart Mary Freeman in 1991.  They have four children — Koby, Saul, Ben, and Molly — and live in Bloomfield Township.

Andy learned and worked in Haitian Creole and Tibetan and also studied French, Sanskrit, and Hindi. He remains an avid ice hockey player and enjoys yoga, mountain biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and other wilderness adventures.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Congressional Progressive Caucus (Deputy Whip)

Medicare for All

Gun Violence Prevention Task Force

Pro-Choice

LGBT Equality

Armenian

Ukranian

PFAS Task Force

Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Alzheimer’s Task Force

Cancer Survivors Caucus

Crohns and Colitis Caucus

Manufacturing Caucus

Anti-Semitism Task Force

Blue Collar Task Force

Task Force on Poverty and Opportunity

Freshman Working Group on Addiction

India Caucus

Autism Caucus

International Labor Rights Caucus

Congressional Animal Protection Caucus

Task Force on Aging and Families

Latino Jewish Caucus

Black Jewish Caucus

Public Works & Infrastructure Caucus

Great Lakes Task Force

Future of Transportation Caucus

French Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

312 Cannon HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-4961
Fax: (202) 226-1033

Warren Office

30500 Van Dyke Avenue
Suite 306
WarrenMI 48093

Phone: (586) 498-7122

Experience

Work Experience

Education

Personal

Born in Detroit and raised in Berkley, MI, Andy is an honors graduate of Williams College and Harvard Law School and holds a Masters Degree from the University of Michigan in Asian Languages and Cultures, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities.

Andy has long been active in the spiritual and social justice life of the Jewish community.  Until his election to Congress, he served as president of a Reconstructionist Jewish synagogue, Congregation T’chiyah, and  as chair of the steering committee of Detroit Jews for Justice, an organization he helped create to fight for racial and economic justice in Detroit.

Andy married his high school sweetheart Mary Freeman in 1991.  They have four children — Koby, Saul, Ben, and Molly — and live in Bloomfield Township.

Andy learned and worked in Haitian Creole and Tibetan and also studied French, Sanskrit, and Hindi. He remains an avid ice hockey player and enjoys yoga, mountain biking, canoeing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and other wilderness adventures.

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C.
228 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: Phone: (202) 225-4961

Warren
30500 Van Dyke Avenue
Suite 306
Warren, MI 48093
Phone: Phone: (586) 498-7122

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Andrew Saul Levin (born August 10, 1960) is an American attorney and politician who serves as the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 9th congressional district. He is a member of the Democratic Party.

Levin was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2018, succeeding his retiring father, Sander Levin. He is the nephew of former U.S. Senator Carl Levin.[1]

Early life and education

Andy Levin was born on August 10, 1960,[2] to Jewish parents Sander Levin and Vicki Schlafer. Sander was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1982. Andy grew up with two sisters, Jennifer and Madeleine, and a brother, Matthew.[3]

Levin graduated from Williams College with a bachelor’s degree. He earned a master’s degree in Asian languages and culture from the University of Michigan and a Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School.[4]

Early career

Levin was a staff attorney for the U.S. Commission on the Future of Worker-Management Relations in 1994 and worked as a trade union organizer and director. He ran as a Democrat for the 13th district seat in the Michigan State Senate in 2006.[5] He lost to Republican John Pappageorge by 0.6% of the vote.[6] After the election, he directed Voice@Work, a program seeking to expand trade union membership.[1]

In 2007, Governor Jennifer Granholm appointed Levin deputy director in the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor, and Economic Growth (DELEG).[7] He oversaw the “No Worker Left Behind” program, which provided job training to unemployed workers.[8] In 2009, Granholm named him chief workforce officer.[9] In 2010, Granholm named him acting director of DELEG, a role he served in until the end of her administration in 2011.[10][11] He founded the clean energy firm Levin Energy Partners LLC and serves as president of Lean & Green Michigan.[4]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

Levin ran to succeed his father in the U.S. House of Representatives in Michigan’s 9th congressional district.[12] He defeated former State Representative Ellen Lipton and attorney Martin Brook in the primary election with 52.5% of the vote.[13] Levin defeated Republican businesswoman Candius Stearns in the general election.[14]

Levin ran for a second term in 2020. He defeated Republican Charles Langworthy and several minor candidates, with 57.8% of the vote.[15]

Tenure

In November 2020, The New York Times reported that Levin was considered a possible candidate for Secretary of Labor in the Biden administration; Mayor of Boston Marty Walsh was ultimately named to the post in 2021.[16]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Michigan’s 9th District Democratic primary results, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Andy Levin 49,612 52.4
DemocraticEllen Lipton40,17442.5
DemocraticMartin Brook4,8655.1
Total votes94,651 100.0
Michigan’s 9th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Andy Levin 181,734 59.7
RepublicanCandius Stearns112,12336.8
Working ClassAndrea Kirby6,7972.2
GreenJohn McDermott3,9091.3
Total votes304,563 100.0
Democratic hold
Michigan’s 9th congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Andy Levin 230,318 57.7
RepublicanCharles Langworthy153,29638.4
Working ClassAndrea Kirby8,9702.2
LibertarianMike Saliba6,5321.6
Total votes399,116 100.0
Democratic hold

Personal life

Levin and his wife Mary (née Freeman) have four children, and live in Bloomfield Township.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Amann, Paula (January 18, 2007). “In Focus: Andy Levin”. Washington Jewish Week. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018 – via HighBeam.
  2. ^ “Michigan new members 2019”. The Hill. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  3. ^ Associated Press (September 4, 2008). “Rep. Sander Levin’s wife Victoria Levin dies at 74”. Crains Detroit Business. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c “Andy Levin announces bid for father’s seat in Congress”. Crainsdetroit.com. December 6, 2017. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  5. ^ “Levin says Pappageorge resorting to dirty tricks | News”. theoaklandpress.com. October 28, 2006. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  6. ^ “Pappageorge defeats Levin”. The Oakland Press. November 8, 2006. Archived from the original on March 13, 2012. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  7. ^ “Gov. Granholm, Director Swanson announce appointment of Andy Levin as Department of Labor & Economic Growth Deputy Director”. US Fed News Service. January 11, 2007. Archived from the original on November 15, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018 – via HighBeam.
  8. ^ “Michigan’s No Worker Left Behind program reaches capacity as funding dries up”. MLive.com. June 29, 2010. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  9. ^ “Granholm names Andy Levin as Michigan’s chief workforce officer; will oversee state’s workforce services”. MLive.com. November 4, 2009. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  10. ^ “Andy Levin rules out run for Michigan governor”. Detroitnews.com. November 21, 2017. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  11. ^ Associated Press (July 19, 2010). “Andy Levin to lead state department for energy, economy”. MLive.com. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  12. ^ “Andy Levin looks to take dad Sander Levin’s seat in Congress”. Freep.com. July 13, 2018. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  13. ^ “Andy Levin wins decisive victory in 9th Congressional District”. Freep.com. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  14. ^ “Democrat Andy Levin wins father’s U.S. House seat”. Detroitnews.com. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  15. ^ Burke, Melissa Nann. “Levin wins second term in Congress”. The Detroit News. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  16. ^ “Who Are Contenders for Biden’s Cabinet?”. The New York Times. November 11, 2020. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 11, 2020.
  17. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Retrieved March 29, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan’s 9th congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
328th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative for 9th

Andy Levin (D)181,73459.7%
Candius Stearns (R)112,12336.8%
Andrea Kirby ()6,7972.2%
John McDermott (G)3,9031.3%
TOTAL304,557

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

LEVIN, ANDY has run in 3 races for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $3,044,719.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Education and Labor (vice chair)
Committee on Foreign Affairs

Subcommittees

Higher Education and Workforce Investment
Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions
Asia, the Pacific, and Nonproliferation

Voting Record

See: Government Page

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Committee on Education and Labor

Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions. Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education

Committee on Foreign Affairs 

Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation (Vice Chair), Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, Migration and International Economic Policy

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Representative Levin.

Issues

 

Democracy

Peace and Human Rights

As a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and long-time human rights advocate, I am committed to fighting for civil and human rights for all people at home and abroad.

The U.S. must partner with our neighbors across the globe to maintain national security and peace, fight infectious disease, and tackle injustice. We have to keep our commitments and continue to invest in foreign assistance, without which we cannot hope to achieve a more peaceful and prosperous world. And we must always choose diplomacy and engagement over saber-rattling and war.

We must also fight immigration policies that violate the rights of those seeking safety in our country. Policies like separating families and detaining children are an abomination, and we must reunify families while affording people—especially those who have spent years living, working and paying taxes here—a fair, legal path to citizenship.

Immigrants in our communities also deserve not to be treated as a monolith, but to have their cases heard individually in immigration courts. That is why I introduced the bipartisan Deferred Removal for Iraqi Nationals Including Minorities Act to protect Iraqi nationals—including Chaldean Christians—who will face persecution for their religion, ethnicity or ties to America if they are forced back to Iraq against their will.

Economy

Standard of Living

Every policy decision I make as a Member of Congress and as the vice chair of the Education and Labor Committee is about raising the standard of living for working people and guaranteeing economic justice for all. Our country, our economy and our education system must work for every American—not just a wealthy few.

As we work to restore economic mobility and rebuild the middle class in America, we must make sure that that a full-time job guarantees the ability to live with dignity. This means restoring the freedom to form unions and organize collectively, raising the minimum wage, establishing a national paid leave insurance program so everyone can afford to take necessary time off to care for themselves and their loved ones, and ensuring strong workplace protections so that no one has to face discrimination, harassment or unsafe conditions on the job. In fact, the first bill I introduced as a Member of Congress, H.J. Res. 44, would reverse a Trump administration rule that eliminated certain protections for workers in cases of workplace injuries.

We must also ensure all children and Americans, regardless of their zip code, have access to a safe place to live and a high-quality education that provides them with the resources and support necessary to reach their full potential. Investing in universal public education from pre-school to college and enhancing our trade school programs and workplace training will build a strong future for Michigan’s kids and workers.

Affordable housing, an equitable education system, effective worker training programs and strong worker protections lift all working families and will help build a stronger economy for Michigan and our nation.

Environment

Over the past three decades, Michigan has seen unprecedented rises in temperature, heavier rainfalls, and more extreme weather events due to climate change.

Climate change is damaging our Great Lakes, forests, and farm lands, all of which are vital to our Michigan way of life. As a nature lover and committed environmentalist, I cannot overstate how important it is for our nation to protect our environment and address climate change with urgency and creativity. This means investing in green renewable energy resources that will create reliable, good-paying jobs, keeping the commitments our country made in the Paris Agreement to reduce carbon emissions, and ensuring full funding for vital conservation programs like the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

In addition to tackling climate change, we must also take action to fight pollutants that plague our air, land and waterways and poison our drinking water. Sadly, Michigan is all too familiar with the dangers that unsafe and polluted drinking water pose for our communities. Dangerous levels of toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—man-made chemicals that are used in many consumer products and industrial applications—are consistently being found across our great state. That’s why I joined the bipartisan Congressional PFAS Task Force, which works to urgently address the public health threat created by these dangerous chemicals, protect our communities and ensure access to safe drinking water.

Health Care

Health

As a two-time cancer survivor and father of two kids with Crohn’s disease, I know that health care is a human right—not a privilege for those who can afford it.

Right now, we live in a country where pharmaceutical companies make billions in profits while working people have to crowd-sourc funding to cover their health care costs. And, despite all the money we’re spending, Americans still have worse health outcomes compared to other countries. It doesn’t have to be this way.

We have the means to streamline our bloated, cumbersome health care system by expanding Medicare—a program that already works—to cover every American. This is the surest way to guarantee health care for all while strengthening protections for people with pre-existing conditions and lowering inhumane and unsustainable prescription drug costs. That is why I am an original cosponsor of the Medicare for All Act.

At the same time, until we build the political consensus to achieve that big picture change, we have to defend and expand the Affordable Care Act to protect people with pre-existing conditions and lower drug costs. That’s why I introduced the STOP GAMES Act, which would prevent drug companies from gaming the system and ultimately help cheaper, generic drugs come to market faster.

We must also treat our nation’s gun violence epidemic like the public health crisis that it is. After the Sandy Hook school shooting, we said never again. After the Orlando nightclub shooting, we said never again. After the Parkland, FL shooting, we said never again. Thoughts and prayers are no longer—and have never been—enough.

It is past time for our country to enact gun safety laws that will save lives and end the horrors of gun violence. As a member of the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force, I promise to make good on our word when we say, “never again.” Sensible gun safety laws like universal background checks, banning assault weapons and undetectable firearms, and stopping online ammunition sales will prevent gun violence and protect our loved ones.

X
Haley StevensHaley Stevens – MI11

Current Position: US Representative for MI11th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Featured Quote: 
Today, my amendment with @repmeijer to the @nist reauthorization bill passed through @HouseScience. This addition to the bill will provide funding to expand MEP center’s workforce development efforts and will promote the resiliency of domestic supply chains!

Featured Video: 
Haley Stevens Gives Passionate Speech About ‘Scourge’ Of Gun Violence

Haley Stevens continues push for Paul Whelan’s release from Russian prison
The Morning Sun, MARK CAVITTJuly 27, 2021 (Medium)

Members of Congress are continuing to call for the release of Americans wrongfully detained in Russian prisons.

On Thursday, U.S. Reps. Haley Stevens (MI-11) and August Pfluger (TX-11 ) held a press conference Thursday with family members of Paul Whelan, a Michigan native, and Trevor Reed, a Texas native, as well as members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Whelan, 51, a Novi resident, traveled to Moscow in December 2019 to attend a wedding of a personal friend. On Dec. 28, he was arrested by Russia’s Federal Security Service at the Metropol Hotel in Moscow who later charged him with espionage. Even though prosecutors never presented any evidence to prove his alleged wrongdoing, Whelan was sentenced on June 15, 2020 to 16 years in a Mordovian labor camp.

“Today marks 944 days since my constituent, Paul Whelan, has been wrongfully detained in Russia,” she said. “That’s 944 days that he has been away from his friends, his family, a comfortable bed, and his community in Novi, Michigan. It’s 944 days too long. He’s being held in a prison camp where he has been since August 2020 following a complete sham of a trial where they didn’t have the evidence.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MI11th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

Featured Quote: 
Today, my amendment with @repmeijer to the @nist reauthorization bill passed through @HouseScience. This addition to the bill will provide funding to expand MEP center’s workforce development efforts and will promote the resiliency of domestic supply chains!

Featured Video: 
Haley Stevens Gives Passionate Speech About ‘Scourge’ Of Gun Violence

News

Haley Stevens continues push for Paul Whelan’s release from Russian prison
The Morning Sun, MARK CAVITTJuly 27, 2021 (Medium)

Members of Congress are continuing to call for the release of Americans wrongfully detained in Russian prisons.

On Thursday, U.S. Reps. Haley Stevens (MI-11) and August Pfluger (TX-11 ) held a press conference Thursday with family members of Paul Whelan, a Michigan native, and Trevor Reed, a Texas native, as well as members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Whelan, 51, a Novi resident, traveled to Moscow in December 2019 to attend a wedding of a personal friend. On Dec. 28, he was arrested by Russia’s Federal Security Service at the Metropol Hotel in Moscow who later charged him with espionage. Even though prosecutors never presented any evidence to prove his alleged wrongdoing, Whelan was sentenced on June 15, 2020 to 16 years in a Mordovian labor camp.

“Today marks 944 days since my constituent, Paul Whelan, has been wrongfully detained in Russia,” she said. “That’s 944 days that he has been away from his friends, his family, a comfortable bed, and his community in Novi, Michigan. It’s 944 days too long. He’s being held in a prison camp where he has been since August 2020 following a complete sham of a trial where they didn’t have the evidence.”

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About

Haley Stevens 1

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Haley Stevens grew up in Rochester Hills, Michigan, and graduated from Seaholm High School in Birmingham. She earned a master’s degree in social policy and philosophy and a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy from American University.

Before being elected to Congress, Congresswoman Stevens served as the Chief of Staff to the U.S. Auto Rescue Task Force, the federal initiative responsible for saving General Motors, Chrysler, and 200,000 Michigan Jobs. She also played a key role in setting up the Office of Recovery for Automotive Communities and Workers, and the White House Office of Manufacturing Policy. After serving in the Obama Administration, Congresswoman Stevens worked in a manufacturing research lab focused on the future of work in the digital age.

Congresswoman Haley Stevens sits on the House Committee on Education & Labor, and the House Committee on Science, Space & Technology, where she also serves as Chairwoman of the Research & Technology Subcommittee. On these Committees, Congresswoman Stevens works to protect access to healthcare, promote manufacturing, expand educational opportunity, stand up for workers’ rights, and increase investment in critical research and development.

Congresswoman Stevens resides in Rochester Hills and attends Kensington Church in Troy.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Co-Chair, Future of Work Task Force

Gun Violence Prevention Task Force

PFAS Task Force

Bipartisan Task Force to Combat Anti-Semitism

New Democrat Coalition

Manufacturing Caucus

Automotive Caucus

Auto Care Caucus

Animal Protection Caucus

Caucus to End the Youth Vaping Epidemic

Global Investment in America Caucus

India Caucus

Vice Chair, American Sikh Congressional Caucus

Diabetes Caucus

Black Maternal Health Caucus

Robotics Caucus

Chemistry Caucus

Boating Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

1510 Longworth House Office Building
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-8171

Livonia Office

37695 Pembroke Avenue
LivoniaMI 48152

Phone: (734) 853-3040

Experience

Work Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C.
227 Cannon HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: Phone: (202) 225-8171

Livonia
37695 Pembroke Avenue
Livonia, MI 48152
Phone: Phone: (734) 853-3040

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Haley Maria Stevens[1] (born June 24, 1983) is an American politician from the state of Michigan. A Democrat, she is the member of the United States House of Representatives from Michigan’s 11th congressional district. The district includes many of Detroit‘s northern and western suburbs, such as Auburn Hills, Troy, Livonia, Canton Township, Bloomfield Hills, West Bloomfield Township, Novi, Rochester Hills, Birmingham, and Northville.

Early life and career

Stevens grew up in Rochester Hills, Michigan. She graduated from Seaholm High School in Birmingham, Michigan. She attended American University, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in political science and philosophy, and a Master of Arts in social policy and philosophy.[2] She became involved in politics in 2006, working for the Michigan Democratic Party as a volunteer organizer. She worked on Hillary Clinton‘s and Barack Obama‘s presidential campaigns in 2008, beginning with Clinton before the primary.[3]

In 2009, Steven Rattner hired Stevens to join the Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry, and she served as his chief of staff.[3] She worked for the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute in Chicago, returning to Michigan in 2017.[4]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

Over January and February 2017, Stevens moved back to Rochester Hills. She announced her candidacy for the United States House of Representatives seat in Michigan’s 11th congressional district in April 2017. The district had been represented by two-term Republican Dave Trott.[5]

Trott announced his retirement in September 2017, making the 11th an open seat.[4] Stevens defeated Tim Greimel in the Democratic Party primary election[6] and Republican nominee Lena Epstein in the general election.[7] Her victory, and that of Elissa Slotkin in the neighboring 8th district, made it the first time since the 1930s that no Republicans represented Oakland County in the House.[8] She also became the first Democrat to represent the 11th for a full term since it assumed its current configuration in 2003.

Stevens and Colin Allred, both alumni of the Obama administration, were selected as co-presidents of the House Democratic Freshman Class of the 116th United States Congress.[9]

2020

Stevens ran for reelection. She was unopposed in the Democratic primary[10] and defeated the Republican nominee, Eric Esshaki.[11]

Tenure

As of November 2021, Stevens had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 100% of the time.[12]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Democratic primary results, Michigan’s 11th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Haley Stevens 24,309 27.0
DemocraticTim Greimel19,67321.8
DemocraticSuneel Gupta19,25021.4
DemocraticFayrouz Saad17,49919.4
DemocraticNancy Skinner9,40710.5
Total votes90,138 100.0
Michigan’s 11th congressional district, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Haley Stevens 181,912 51.8
RepublicanLena Epstein158,46345.2
LibertarianLeonard Schwartz5,7991.7
IndependentCooper Nye4,7271.3
Total votes350,901 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican
Michigan’s 11th congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Haley Stevens (incumbent) 226,128 50.2
RepublicanEric Esshaki215,40547.8
LibertarianLeonard Schwartz8,9362.0
Total votes450,473 100.0
Democratic hold

Personal life

Stevens lives in Rochester Hills.[5] She and Rob Gulley, a software engineer she met in high school, began dating in adulthood and became engaged in June 2020.[15] They married on September 3, 2021.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ “City of Chicago FOIA Request Log” (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on January 7, 2019. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  2. ^ “House website About section”. Representative Haley Stevens. December 3, 2012. Archived from the original on October 9, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  3. ^ a b “Detroit Free Press endorsement: Elissa Slotkin and Haley Stevens for Congress”. Detroit Free Press. October 31, 2018. Archived from the original on November 7, 2018. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  4. ^ a b “Michigan native comes home for run against Rep. Trott”. Detroitnews.com. April 27, 2017. Archived from the original on November 9, 2018. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Jonathan Oosting (April 27, 2017). “Michigan native comes home for run against Rep. Trott”. The Detroit News. Archived from the original on November 9, 2018. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  6. ^ “Lena Epstein and Haley Stevens will compete for 11th Congressional District seat | Local News”. theoaklandpress.com. August 7, 2018. Archived from the original on November 7, 2018. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  7. ^ “Haley Stevens defeats Lena Epstein in race for open U.S. House seat”. Freep.com. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  8. ^ Laitner, Bill (November 8, 2018). “Republican and Patterson’s hold on Oakland County may be at an end”. Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on April 10, 2019. Retrieved January 21, 2019. All four congressional districts with a footprint in Oakland County will be held by Democrats come Jan. 1, with both the 8th District and the 11th District flipping from Republican on Tuesday.
  9. ^ Balz, Dan. “A leader of the Democratic Class of 2018 confronts the challenges of governing”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  10. ^ “2020 Michigan Election Results”. Michigan Secretary of State.
  11. ^ Spangler, Todd. “Haley Stevens holds off Eric Esshaki in U.S. House 11th District race”. Detroit Free Press.
  12. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved November 29, 2021.
  13. ^ “Members”. New Democrat Coalition. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  14. ^ “Featured Members”. Problem Solvers Caucus. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  15. ^ Spangler, Todd (June 8, 2020). “Rep. Haley Stevens’ boyfriend proposes on romantic Orchard Lake boat ride”. Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on June 8, 2020. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  16. ^ @HaleyLive (September 5, 2021). “On September 3rd, Rob Gulley and I said forever and ever and I became his adoring wife. Blessed beyond belief and e…” (Tweet) – via Twitter.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan’s 11th congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
355th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative for 11th

Haley Stevens (D)181,91251.8%
Lena Epstein (R)158,46345.2%
Leonard Schwartz (L)5,7991.7%
Cooper Nye ()4,7271.3%
TOTAL350,901

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

STEVENS, HALEY has run in 2 races for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $7,280,453.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Committee on Education and Labor
House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

Subcommittees

Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
Workforce Protections
Research and Technology

Voting Record

See: Government Page

Issues

Committees

House Committee on Education & Labor 

Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions

Subcommittee on Workforce Protections

House Committee on Science, Space & Technology

Chairwoman, Subcommittee on Research & Technology

Subcommittee on Energy

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Representative Stevens.

Issues

X
Debbie DingellDebbie Dingell – MI12

Current Position: US Representative for MI 12th District since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat

Featured Quote: 
Today, the bipartisan @January6thCmte is holding its first hearing with @CapitolPolice & @DCPoliceDept
officers whose lives were threatened by violent insurrectionists. We owe it to them to get the clear facts about that dark day.

Featured Video: 
‘This Was A Wakeup Call To The Country,’ Says Rep. Debbie Dingell | TODAY

Detroit — Lawmakers and activists gathered in Detroit on Saturday advocating for President Joe Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure plan approved earlier this month.

U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, held a town hall at the Eastside Community Network and talked about how the plan would improve infrastructure and promote environmental justice in the region.

Sanders, chair of the “Build Back Better Budget” committee, said some Republicans who are willing to give tax breaks to the rich are also eager to kick 30 million people off of health care by revoking the Affordable Care Act.

“The tie-breaking vote may come down to the Vice President at 5 a.m.,” Sanders said. “Republican friends are saying we can’t because we’re going to raise taxes. They’re right. We are finally going to raise taxes on the rich who are not paying their fair share. Does it go as far as I, Rashida, Debbie and Andy would like? No, but it will be the biggest piece of legislation in our lifetime.”

Representatives of the Michigan Republican Party were not immediately available for comment.

Tlaib and Sanders were joined by U.S. Reps. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, Rep. Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township, and local advocates with the Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition, We the People of Detroit and Michigan United.

The town hall comes amid ongoing negotiations and drafting of the infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill expected to be unveiled next month.

The bipartisan plan received a 69-30 vote, including Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, and is the cornerstone of Biden’s agenda.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MI 12th District since 2015
Affiliation: Democrat

Featured Quote: 
Today, the bipartisan @January6thCmte is holding its first hearing with @CapitolPolice & @DCPoliceDept
officers whose lives were threatened by violent insurrectionists. We owe it to them to get the clear facts about that dark day.

Featured Video: 
‘This Was A Wakeup Call To The Country,’ Says Rep. Debbie Dingell | TODAY

News

Detroit — Lawmakers and activists gathered in Detroit on Saturday advocating for President Joe Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure plan approved earlier this month.

U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, held a town hall at the Eastside Community Network and talked about how the plan would improve infrastructure and promote environmental justice in the region.

Sanders, chair of the “Build Back Better Budget” committee, said some Republicans who are willing to give tax breaks to the rich are also eager to kick 30 million people off of health care by revoking the Affordable Care Act.

“The tie-breaking vote may come down to the Vice President at 5 a.m.,” Sanders said. “Republican friends are saying we can’t because we’re going to raise taxes. They’re right. We are finally going to raise taxes on the rich who are not paying their fair share. Does it go as far as I, Rashida, Debbie and Andy would like? No, but it will be the biggest piece of legislation in our lifetime.”

Representatives of the Michigan Republican Party were not immediately available for comment.

Tlaib and Sanders were joined by U.S. Reps. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, Rep. Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township, and local advocates with the Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition, We the People of Detroit and Michigan United.

The town hall comes amid ongoing negotiations and drafting of the infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill expected to be unveiled next month.

The bipartisan plan received a 69-30 vote, including Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, and is the cornerstone of Biden’s agenda.

Twitter

About

Debbie Dingell 1

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell represents the 12th District of Michigan in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Before being elected to Congress, Debbie was the Chair of the Wayne State University (WSU) Board of Governors.  An active civic and community leader, she is a recognized national advocate for women and children.

For more than 30 years Debbie served one of Michigan’s largest employers, the General Motors (GM) Corporation, where she was President of the GM Foundation and a senior executive responsible for public affairs.   In her commitment to job creation, Debbie led the effort to bring the 10,000 Small Businesses initiative, a $20 million partnership designed to help create jobs and economic growth, to southeast Michigan. She is a past chair of the Manufacturing Initiative at the American Automotive Policy Council.

With values instilled by her Catholic education, Debbie’s activism took root in her passion for issues important to women and children.  She successfully fought to have women included in federally-funded health research, and advocated for greater awareness of issues directly related to women’s health, including breast cancer and women’s heart health. She is a founder and past chair of the National Women’s Health Resource Center and the Children’s Inn at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  She has served on numerous boards related to women’s issues including the advisory boards for the NIH Panel for Women’s Research, the Michigan Women’s Economic Club, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the board of the Michigan Women’s Foundation.  She was a co-founder of both the first Race for the Cures in Michigan and in Washington, D.C.

Debbie has led a number of efforts and initiatives related to young people and education stemming from her role as a WSU Governor and co-chair of the Children’s Leadership Council, a business-led advocacy group that promotes investment in early childhood education.  She chaired the Michigan Infant Mortality Task Force, the Baby Your Baby public education campaign that reduced infant mortality rates in Michigan, and has served on the board of Michigan’s Children, the only statewide independent voice working to ensure that public policies are made in the best interest of children from cradle to career. She was appointed by Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm to serve on the Early Childhood Investment Corporation and the Cherry Commission on Higher Education and Economic Growth.

Much of Debbie’s recent work has been focused on ethical issues and social responsibility as they relate to government and business. She co-chaired One United Michigan, which sought to preserve and support programs that ensure equal opportunity in Michigan. She chairs the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition, a statewide organization that brings business, labor and government together to find commonality on issues.  She continues to serve on the Parade Company board of directors of which she is past chair, where she helped save America’s Thanksgiving Parade, an important Detroit tradition.  A known “bridge-builder,” she continues to promote and lead efforts toward greater understanding among people of differing points of views and backgrounds.

Debbie is a respected voice in Michigan.  She co-hosted Detroit Public Television’s “Am I Right,” regularly served as a panelist on “Flashpoint,” a public affairs program on WDIV-TV4 Detroit, and was named one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Michigan by Crain’s Detroit Business.

Debbie resides in Dearborn.  She holds both a B.S.F.S. in Foreign Services and an M.S. in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

 

She also serves on the following caucuses and working groups:

  • Agriculture and Rural America Task Force
  • Auto Care Caucus
  • Bipartisan Congressional Task Force to Combat Identity Theft and Fraud
  • Bipartisan Heroin Task Force
  • Bipartisan Task Force for Combating Anti-Semitism
  • Cancer Survivors Caucus
  • Congressional 21st Century Skills Caucus
  • Congressional Access to Civil Legal Service Caucus
  • Congressional Addiction, Treatment and Recovery Caucus
  • Congressional Air Force Caucus
  • Congressional Aluminum Caucus
  • Congressional Animal Protection Caucus
  • Congressional Arts Caucus
  • Congressional Arthritis Caucus
  • Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC)
  • Congressional Assisting Caregivers Today Caucus
  • Congressional Asthma and Allergy Caucus
  • Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus
  • Congressional Blue Collar Caucus
  • Congressional Brain Injury Task Force
  • Congressional Building Trades Caucus
  • Congressional Buy American Caucus
  • Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues
  • Congressional Caucus on Deadliest Cancers
  • Congressional Caucus on International Exchange and Study
  • Congressional Caucus on Maternity Care
  • Congressional Caucus on Poland
  • Congressional Caucus on Prescription Drug Abuse
  • Congressional Caucus on Public-Private Partnerships
  • Congressional Chemistry Caucus
  • Congressional Childhood Cancer Caucus
  • Congressional Children’s Health Care Caucus
  • Congressional Civility Caucus
  • Congressional Coast Guard Caucus
  • Congressional Cooperative Business Caucus
  • Congressional Cyber Security Caucus
  • Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
  • Congressional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Caucus
  • Congressional Energy and National Security Caucus
  • Congressional Fire Services Caucus
  • Congressional Food Safety Caucus
  • Congressional Hearing Health Caucus
  • Congressional Heart and Stroke Caucus
  • Congressional Homelessness Caucus
  • Congressional House Cancer Caucus
  • Congressional House Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional Invasive Species Caucus
  • Congressional Inventions Caucus
  • Congressional Labor and Working Families Caucus
  • Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus
  • Congressional Lung Cancer Caucus
  • Congressional Lupus Caucus
  • Congressional Mental Health Caucus
  • Congressional Military Family Caucus
  • Congressional Military Mental Health Care Caucus
  • Congressional Military Sexual Assault Prevention Caucus
  • Congressional Motorsports Caucus
  • Congressional NASA Caucus
  • Congressional National Parks Caucus
  • Congressional Neuroscience Caucus
  • Congressional Pension Protection for Working Families Caucus
  • Congressional PFAS Task Force
  • Congressional Pre-K Caucus
  • Congressional Privacy Caucus
  • Congressional Public Health Caucus
  • Congressional Public Transportation Caucus
  • Congressional Scouting Caucus
  • Congressional Skin Cancer Caucus
  • Congressional Small Business Caucus
  • Congressional Soccer Caucus
  • Congressional Social Work Caucus
  • Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus
  • Congressional US-China Working Group
  • Congressional Veterans Jobs Caucus
  • Congressional Victims’ Rights Caucus
  • Congressional Wildlife Refuge Caucus
  • House Automotive Caucus
  • House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force
  • House Oceans Caucus
  • House Sugar Caucus
  • Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus
  • Medical Technology Caucus
  • National Service Caucus
  • Northern Border Caucus
  • Public Works and Infrastructure Caucus
  • Small Brewers Caucus
  • Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC) Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

116 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4071
Fax: (202) 226-0371
Get directions

Dearborn Office

19855 West Outer Drive
Suite 103-E
Dearborn, MI 48124
Phone: (313) 278-2936

Ypsilanti Office

301 West Michigan Avenue
Suite 400
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
Phone: (734) 481-1100

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

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Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

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Wikipedia Entry

Deborah Ann Dingell (/ˈdɪŋɡəl/; née Insley; November 23, 1953) is a Democratic Party politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Michigan’s 12th congressional district since 2015. She is the widow of John Dingell, her predecessor in the seat, who holds the record as the longest-serving member of Congress in U.S. history. She worked as a consultant to the American Automobile Policy Council.[1] She was a superdelegate for the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.[2][3]

Dingell is active in several Michigan and Washington, D.C., charities and serves on a number of charitable boards. She is a founder and past chair of the National Women’s Health Resource Center and the Children’s Inn at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).[4] She is also a member of the Board of Directors for Vital Voices Global Partnership.[5] She is a 1975 graduate of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Life and career

Dingell with her husband John in 2011

Descended from one of the Fisher brothers, owners of Fisher Body,[6] from 1919 a part of General Motors, she has served as president[7] of the General Motors Foundation and as executive director of Global Community Relations and Government Relations at GM.

She married Representative John Dingell, 27 years her senior, in 1981;[8] she was his second wife. She had grown up as a Republican, but became a Democrat soon after marrying Dingell. Their marriage lasted 38 years until her husband’s death on February 7, 2019, at the age of 92.

She is a member of the Democratic National Committee from Michigan and chaired Vice President Al Gore‘s campaign in Michigan in 2000. In 2004, she also helped secure the Michigan Democratic primary and general election vote for John Kerry in Michigan.

In November 2006, Dingell was elected to Wayne State University‘s board of governors.[9]

Dingell and Senator Carl Levin were proponents of moving up Michigan’s presidential primary before February 5 in an attempt to garner greater political influence for Michigan during the 2008 Democratic primaries.[10] This resulted in Michigan almost losing its delegates’ votes in the Democratic National Convention.[11]

John Dingell became the longest-serving member of the United States House of Representatives in June 2013 and continued serving until the end of the 113th Congress in January 2015.

When Carl Levin announced his retirement from the U.S. Senate at the end of his term in 2015, Dingell indicated that she was interested in running for his seat.[12] When former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm declined to run for the seat, a Politico writer declared Dingell to be one of the front-runners for the Democratic nomination, alongside Representative Gary Peters.[13] She chose not to run, and Peters won the seat.

In 2018, Dingell introduced a law that would give the Consumer Product Safety Commission the authority to recall defective firearms. John Dingell was a key lawmaker who initially granted the firearms industry this exemption from the 1972 Consumer Product Safety Act that created the Consumer Product Safety Commission.[14]

In July 2019, Dingell voted against a House resolution introduced by Representative Brad Schneider opposing efforts to boycott the State of Israel and the Global Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement targeting Israel for its continued occupation of Palestine.[15] The resolution passed 398–17.[16]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2014

Dingell indicated that she planned to run for her husband’s congressional seat after he announced his retirement.[17] On August 5, she won the Democratic primary. On November 4, she won the general election, defeating Republican Terry Bowman.[18] When Dingell was sworn in, she became the first U.S. non-widowed woman in Congress to succeed her husband. His father, John Dingell Sr., held Michigan’s 12th district for 22 years before his son won it. Altogether, the Dingells have represented this district and its predecessors for 89 consecutive years as of 2021.[19][20] The district was numbered as the 15th from 1933 to 1965, the 16th from 1965 to 2003, the 15th again from 2003 to 2013, and has been the 12th since 2013.

Tenure

Trump impeachment

After Dingell voted to impeach President Donald Trump, Trump attacked Dingell during a campaign rally in Battle Creek, musing that her late husband, might be in hell, saying of him, “Maybe he’s looking up, I don’t know, I don’t know, maybe, maybe. But let’s assume he’s looking down.”[21] She was attending a bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus gathering when she was told of Trump’s remarks. Numerous members of both parties came to Dingell’s defense.[22] In her response to the incident, Dingell called for a return to civility, saying, “some things should be off limits.”[23]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

See also

References

  1. ^ Beene, Ryan (October 26, 2009). “Debbie Dingell to take new post at American Automotive Policy Council”. Crain’s Detroit Business. Crain Communications. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  2. ^ Akers, Mary Ann (February 27, 2008). “Debbie Dingell: Angst-ridden Superdelegate and Congressional Spouse”. The Washington Post (The Sleuth (blog)). Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  3. ^ “Congressman John Dingell Makes Washington Quake, but Not His Executive Wife, Debbie”. People.com. Retrieved November 25, 2014.
  4. ^ “Meet Debbie”. Office of Debbie Dingell. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  5. ^ “Board of Directors”. Vital Voices. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  6. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on June 15, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ “A closer look at Debbie Dingell”. Pennsylvania Main Line News covering local news including local sports, video and multimedia coverage, and classified advertising.
  8. ^ “Debbie Dingell”. Click. Politico. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  9. ^ “Debbie Dingell”. Wayne State University. Archived from the original on January 25, 2013. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  10. ^ Levin, Carl; Dingell, Deborah (March 19, 2008). “New Hampshire Cheated, Too”. The New York Times. Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  11. ^ Shear, Michael D. (December 2, 2007). “DNC Punishes Michigan For Early Primary Date”. The Washington Post (PostPolitics (blog)). Retrieved March 22, 2013.
  12. ^ Bash, Dana (March 11, 2013). “Debbie Dingell considering Senate bid in Michigan”. Political Ticker (blog). CNN. Retrieved March 22, 2013.[permanent dead link]
  13. ^ Hohmann, James (March 22, 2013). “Jennifer Granholm: No run for Carl Levin’s seat”. Politico. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
  14. ^ “Defective firearm bill pits Dingell v. Dingell”. The Detroit News. Retrieved September 24, 2018.
  15. ^ Foran, Clare (July 24, 2019). “Who voted ‘no’ on the House resolution opposing Israel boycott movement”. CNN. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  16. ^ Schneider, Bradley Scott (July 23, 2019). “H.Res.246 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Opposing efforts to delegitimize the State of Israel and the Global Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement targeting Israel”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  17. ^ Allen, Mike (February 25, 2014). “Politico Playbook for Feb. 25, 2014”. Politico. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  18. ^ Allen, Jeremy (November 4, 2014). “Debbie Dingell defeats Terry Bowman in 12th District U.S. House race”. MLive Media Group.
  19. ^ Ostermeier, Eric (February 26, 2014). “Debbie Dingell Eyes Historic Win in 2014”. Smart Politics.
  20. ^ Catalina Camia, USA TODAY (November 2, 2014). “Women poised to break glass ceiling on Election Day”. Usatoday.com. Retrieved November 25, 2014.
  21. ^ Bender, Michael C. (December 19, 2019). “Trump Rallies His Base as House Votes to Impeach”. The Wall Street Journal.
  22. ^ Kane, Paul; Flynn, Meagan; Horton, Alex; Dawsey, Josh (December 19, 2019). “Rep. Debbie Dingell thanks colleagues for support after Trump suggests John Dingell is in hell”. The Washington Post.
  23. ^ Cummings, William (December 19, 2019). Some things should be off-limits’: Dingell calls for civility after Trump’s attack on late husband”. USA Today.
  24. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  25. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
  26. ^ “Macedonia Caucus Co-Chairs on NATO Accession Agreement”. March 14, 2019.
  27. ^ “Featured Members”. Problem Solvers Caucus. Retrieved March 28, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan’s 12th congressional district

2015–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
215th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Energy and Commerce
    • Subcommittee on Health
    • Subcommittee on Communications & Technology
    • Subcommittee on Consumer Protection & Commerce
    • Subcommittee on the Environment & Climate Change
  • Committee on Natural Resources
    • Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public lands
    • Subcommittee on Oversight & Investigations

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

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Rashida TlaibRashida Tlaib – MI13

Current Position: US Representative for MI 13th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2009 – 2014

Featured Quote: 
One time survival checks don’t cut it when the bills haven’t stopped coming in every month. We need monthly, recurring, $2,000 survival checks

Featured Video: 
Rep. Rashida Tlaib on Growing Up in Detroit, Holocaust Comments and Fighting Poverty

Detroit — Lawmakers and activists gathered in Detroit on Saturday advocating for President Joe Biden's $1 trillion infrastructure plan approved earlier this month. U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, held a town hall at the Eastside Community Network and talked about how the plan would improve infrastructure and promote environmental justice in the region. Sanders, chair of the "Build Back Better Budget" committee, said some Republicans who are willing to give tax breaks to the rich are also eager to kick 30 million people off of health care by revoking the Affordable Care Act. "The tie-breaking vote may come down to the Vice President at 5 a.m.," Sanders said. "Republican friends are saying we can't because we're going to raise taxes. They're right. We are finally going to raise taxes on the rich who are not paying their fair share. Does it go as far as I, Rashida, Debbie and Andy would like? No, but it will be the biggest piece of legislation in our lifetime." Representatives of the Michigan Republican Party were not immediately available for comment. Tlaib and Sanders were joined by U.S. Reps. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, Rep. Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township, and local advocates with the Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition, We the People of Detroit and Michigan United. The town hall comes amid ongoing negotiations and drafting of the infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation bill expected to be unveiled next month. The bipartisan plan received a 69-30 vote, including Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, and is the cornerstone of Biden's agenda.
The Detroit News, Sarah RahalAugust 28, 2021 (Medium)

Detroit — Lawmakers and activists gathered in Detroit on Saturday advocating for President Joe Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure plan approved earlier this month.

U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, held a town hall at the Eastside Community Network and talked about how the plan would improve infrastructure and promote environmental justice in the region.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, left, I-Vermont, and U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Detroit, at the town hall event in Detroit on Saturday, August 29, 2021.

Sanders, chair of the “Build Back Better Budget” committee, said some Republicans who are willing to give tax breaks to the rich are also eager to kick 30 million people off of health care by revoking the Affordable Care Act.

“The tie-breaking vote may come down to the Vice President at 5 a.m.,” Sanders said. “Republican friends are saying we can’t because we’re going to raise taxes. They’re right. We are finally going to raise taxes on the rich who are not paying their fair share. Does it go as far as I, Rashida, Debbie and Andy would like? No, but it will be the biggest piece of legislation in our lifetime.”

Representatives of the Michigan Republican Party were not immediately available for comment.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MI 13th District since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2009 – 2014

Featured Quote: 
One time survival checks don’t cut it when the bills haven’t stopped coming in every month. We need monthly, recurring, $2,000 survival checks

Featured Video: 
Rep. Rashida Tlaib on Growing Up in Detroit, Holocaust Comments and Fighting Poverty